SELECTING THE CORRECT PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR A FLORIDA ESTATE

SELECTING THE CORRECT PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR A FLORIDA ESTATE

  1. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS:

As you begin to plan your estate and consider who you would like to serve as your personal representative, it’s important to choose someone who is reliable, trustworthy, and able to handle the responsibilities of the role. In this blog post, we’ll explore some key factors to consider as you make this important decision, including requirements under Florida law.

First, it’s important to understand what a personal representative does. This person, also known as an executor or administrator, is responsible for carrying out the terms of your will and managing your estate after your death. They will be responsible for collecting and distributing your assets, paying your debts and taxes, and handling any legal issues that may arise.

Under Florida law, there are certain requirements that a personal representative must meet in order to qualify for the role. First, they must be over the age of 18. They must also be a Florida resident, unless they are related to you by blood. Additionally, they cannot be a convicted felon. It’s important to keep these requirements in mind as you make your decision.

With these requirements in mind, it’s important to choose someone who is organized and detail-oriented, as the personal representative will need to keep track of a lot of information and handle a variety of tasks. They should also be able to handle the financial aspects of the role, as they will be responsible for managing and distributing your assets.

Another important consideration is the person’s relationship with you and with other family members. It’s often best to choose a personal representative who is close to you and understands your wishes and values. This person should also have a good relationship with other family members, as they will be working closely with them during the estate settlement process.

It’s also a good idea to choose someone who is capable of handling the role emotionally. Dealing with the loss of a loved one and managing an estate can be stressful, and the personal representative will need to be able to handle these challenges with grace and resilience.

Finally, you may want to consider choosing a personal representative who lives in the same state as you, as this can make the estate settlement process easier and more efficient. If you do choose someone who lives out of state, it’s important to make sure they are familiar with the laws and procedures in your state.

As you consider these factors and make your decision, it’s important to have an open and honest conversation with the person you are considering as your personal representative. Make sure they are aware of the responsibilities of the role and are comfortable taking on the task. It’s also a good idea to discuss your plans with other family members to ensure that everyone is on the same page.

Choosing the right personal representative for your estate is an important decision, and it’s one that requires careful consideration. By considering the factors outlined above and having an open and honest conversation with your chosen candidate, you can ensure that your estate is managed in accordance with your wishes and values, and in compliance with Florida law.

  1. FLORIDA STATUTES ON WHO CAN BE THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AKA THE EXECUTOR

Florida Statute 733.303 sets out the qualifications that an individual must meet in order to be eligible to serve as a personal representative of an estate. Under this statute, a person is not qualified to act as a personal representative if they meet any of the following criteria:

  1. They have been convicted of a felony.
  2. They have been convicted of abuse, neglect, or exploitation of an elderly person or a disabled adult in any state or foreign jurisdiction.
  3. They are mentally or physically unable to perform the duties of the role.
  4. They are under the age of 18 years.

If the person named as personal representative in the decedent’s will does not meet these qualifications, the court will appoint a personal representative in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 733.301. This statute outlines the order of priority for appointment of a personal representative, with the decedent’s surviving spouse having first priority unless they waive their right to serve or are found to be unsuitable by the court. If no suitable candidates are nominated in the will or available among the decedent’s family members, the court may appoint any other suitable and competent individual to serve as personal representative.

733.303 Persons not qualified.—

(1) A person is not qualified to act as a personal representative if the person:

(a) Has been convicted of a felony.

(b) Has been convicted in any state or foreign jurisdiction of abuse, neglect, or exploitation of an elderly person or a disabled adult, as those terms are defined in s. 825.101.

(c) Is mentally or physically unable to perform the duties.

(d) Is under the age of 18 years.

(2) If the person named as personal representative in the will is not qualified, letters shall be granted as provided in s. 733.301.

Florida Statute 733.304 sets out the requirements for an individual who is not a resident of Florida to qualify as a personal representative of an estate in the state. According to this statute, a nonresident person cannot serve as a personal representative unless they meet one of the following criteria:

  1. They are a legally adopted child or adoptive parent of the decedent.
  2. They are related to the decedent by lineal consanguinity, meaning they are related by direct bloodline (e.g., parent, child, grandparent, sibling).
  3. They are a spouse or close relative (e.g., brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, or niece) of the decedent, or they are related by lineal consanguinity to any such person.
  4. They are the spouse of a person who is otherwise qualified under this section.

In other words, nonresidents may qualify as personal representatives if they are closely related to the decedent or are married to someone who is closely related to the decedent. This is designed to ensure that the personal representative has a close relationship with the decedent and is familiar with their wishes and values. It also helps to ensure that the personal representative has a connection to the state of Florida and is familiar with the laws and procedures that apply to the estate settlement process in the state.

733.304 Nonresidents.—A person who is not domiciled in the state cannot qualify as personal representative unless the person is:

(1) A legally adopted child or adoptive parent of the decedent;

(2) Related by lineal consanguinity to the decedent;

(3) A spouse or a brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, or niece of the decedent, or someone related by lineal consanguinity to any such person; or

(4) The spouse of a person otherwise qualified under this section.

Are you considering estate planning in Florida? Choosing the right executor is an important decision that can have a big impact on your loved ones after you’re gone. Our experienced attorneys can help you understand the legal considerations involved in selecting an executor and guide you through the process of creating a comprehensive estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets. Contact us today to schedule a consultation and start planning for your family’s future.

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